Posted in #Giveaway, PB, So Many Good Books

My Hair

Perfect Picture Book Friday

My Hair (Faber & Faber, September 2019) by Hannah Lee and illustrated by Allen Fatimaharan is such an appealing book. And I have one copy to give away. (Comment for a chance to win–I’ll randomly draw a name on August 13th. USA only.)

Getting ready for her birthday, a little girl has to decide how to style her hair. Dreadlocks, braids, shaved, cropped, wrapped? She shares about her family and friends and their hair before deciding on something else.

The story is written in rhyme and makes me smile each time I read it. The illustrations are adorable.

Read more about UK debut author, Hannah Lee’s book publication, here. Info about illustrator Allen Fatimaharan and his work can be found here. This is his first picture book, too.

FYI, I received one copy of the book for an honest review.

Posted in So Many Good Books, YA Novels

Dear Martin

DearMartinDear Martin (Crown Books for Young Readers, 2017) by Nic Stone is one of those oft recommended books that didn’t disappoint. It’s compelling, moving, sad, and hopeful.
Justyce McAllister is a senior at Braselton Prep and despite what his friend Manny thinks, he’s not treated equally. He found that out the hard way when helping his former girlfriend who is too drunk to drive and he gets arrested. He’s released, but the experience wakes him up to the reality of what he’s been reading in the news. And that’s just the beginning. Things are going to get worse. Much worse.
This book made me sad and mad on behalf of Justyce and young men like him. I wish everyone would read it.
Amazingly enough, this book is Nic Stone’s debut. Her newest book is Odd One Out. Read more on her website. Follow her on Twitter here.

Posted in So Many Good Books, YA Novels

The Belles

The-BellesThe Belles (Freeform Books, 2018) by Dhonielle Clayton is a thought provoking and hard-to-put-down book.
Camille and five other Belles are sixteen. It’s their turn to show what they can do in the Royal Square. One will be chosen as Favorite by the Queen of Orléans. That girl will be the one taking care of the beauty for the royal family and the court for the next three years. And, of course, Camille wants to be the Favorite. The test is for each girl to take a naturally gray Orléansian and turn him/her beautiful. Who will win? More importantly, can a dreadful cycle be broken?
This story has twists and turns, shocks and scares, and ugly and beautiful.
I’m excited about the sequel called The Everlasting Rose. Read about it and Dhonielle’s other books here.
Read about the author here. Follow her on Twitter here.

Posted in MG Novels, So Many Good Books

Just Under the Clouds

JustUndertheCloudsI loved Just Under the Clouds (Alfred A. Knopf, 2018) by Melissa Sarno. It’s such a good book. And has a gorgeous cover.
Twelve-year-old Cora and her family, consisting of her mother and her sister Adare, have been moving from place to place for six years since Daddy died. Now they’re homeless. Cora gets comfort from knowing and climbing trees in Brooklyn, just like her father taught her. But with watching her “different” sister while Mom works, and struggling with algebra in school, Cora worries they’ll never belong anywhere.
Just Under the Clouds is the author’s debut novel. Read about the birth of the story here. Her next book, A Swirl of Ocean, comes out in late summer and I’m really looking forward to it. Read more about Melissa here.

Posted in MG Novels, So Many Good Books

Amal Unbound

Amal-UnboundAmal Unbound (Nancy Paulsen Books, 2018) by Aisha Saeed is SO Good! I’d been hearing a lot about this New York Times bestseller and am really glad I’ve now read it.
Twelve-year-old Amal loves school, but now she has to stay home and watch her little sisters while her mother recovers from the birth of another baby. Amal wants to be a teacher herself someday, so missing this much school is worrying. Her dreams are shattered one day when she is rude to the wrong man–a member of the ruling family in their Pakistani village. For her effrontery, she is taken away from home to be Jawad Sahib’s servant. How can she survive the intrigue among the Khan’s servants? Will she ever be allowed to return home?
This book would make a fantastic movie. As my previous recommendation, I wish kids all over America could read it.
Previously, I’ve recommended Aisha’s YA novel, Written in the Stars. You can read about it here.
I love this list of Fourteen Things about the author.